English

General Information


We write and read more today than at any other point in history. Classes taken in the English Department at Prairie State College will encourage you to build on the written communication skills you have developed in your academic, professional, and community experiences. We will explore how the written word shapes and is shaped by its users; how power and language are linked; and how writing and reading can be challenging, rewarding, enriching.

Our English classes fulfill general education requirements. They prepare you for degrees in fields including Literature, Writing Studies, Marketing and Public Relations, and Cultural Studies. English majors find success in careers ranging from editing, teaching, and law to data analytics, web and social media content development, and technical writing. One thing Toni Morrisson, Vin Diesel, and John Legend share in common: They were all English majors!

Being able to express our ideas clearly in writing allows us to make powerful contributions to our communities and to advance our careers—written communication is one of the top essential skills employers are looking for. We look forward to writing, reading, and thinking more deeply with you.

Course Descriptions

Prerequisite: Appropriate placement on the English Placement Test.

1-4 variable lectures per week: 1-4 variable hrs non-degree, non-transfer credit

This course reviews basic writing and grammar to prepare students for the literacy demands of college coursework. Students practice generating and supporting ideas in coherent, organized short essays. They also practice thinking about the needs and expectations of readers and communicating clearly by avoiding common errors with words and sentences. (may be repeated two times)

Prerequisite: ENG 098 with a C or better and RDG 098 with a C or better or appropriate placement on the English Placement Test.

3 lectures per week 3 hrs credit

This course introduces students to the literacy demands of college-level coursework. Students develop critical thinking and reading strategies as they use the writing process as a way to respond to a diverse range of texts.

(C1 900)

Prerequisite: ENG 099 with a grade of C or better, qualifying placement via multiple measures, or enrollment in an ENG 099 corequisite course.

3 lectures per week 3 hrs credit

This is the first course in the composition sequence. It provides an introduction to college-level writing, with emphasis on rhetorical knowledge, analysis of a diverse range of texts, and conventions of various genres, with special attention to academic writing. Students will develop flexible strategies for critical thinking, reading, and composing processes. This course requires a minimum of four college-level academic writing assignments, totaling a minimum of 5,000 formal/revised words, at least one writing assignment should be a minimum of 1,250 words. Note: Students must receive a course grade of “C” or better in order to pass the course.

(C1 901R)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 Composition I - with a grade of a C or better. Score of 50 (fifty) or higher on English Composition CLEP Exam.

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This is the second course in the composition sequence. It builds on ENG 101 by extending students’ rhetorical knowledge and critical thinking/reading skills, with special attention to information literacy, inquiry-based research, and academic writing. The course requires a minimum of three major academic writing assignments, at least two of which are based on research and contain multiple sources. Note: A course grade of “C” or better is required for IAI transfer

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better or consent of instructor

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

Students write poetry in a variety of genres, learn the structure and elements of poetry and the writing process, and demonstrate an understanding of the critical terminology of the creative writer.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

Students study the elements of nonfiction and the critical terminology of the creative writer, and produce fully developed works of nonfiction. Students explore themselves, their identity, and their world through writing autobiography, family history, and observations on culture, places, and time periods.

(H3 914)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course studies American literature from the precolonial period to the Civil War and includes the style, techniques, and themes of the major writers responsible for shaping the traditions of American literature. Emphasis is on understanding major literary movements in their intellectual, social, and political contexts.

(H3 910D)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This survey course examines the varieties of the Black experience in America as it is found in poetry, the novel, the short story, and drama. Particular emphasis is placed on trends and themes as revealed in changes in style and content.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course focuses on the importance of children’s literature from preschool to adolescence and its enjoyment at home and in the classroom. Through reading a varied selection of books, students learn to evaluate, select, discuss, and use literature for children. It is recommended for teachers, aides, librarians, and parents. (same as ED 220)

(H3 903)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

Students read and enjoy poetry of various types and periods. Through close reading of selected poems, students learn to appreciate the beauty and art of poetry and its relevance to their own lives and emotions.

(H3 912)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course surveys British literature from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings through 18th-century Neoclassicism. Writers and their works are studied in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts.

(H3 913)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course surveys British literature from 1800 to the present with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts.

(H3 901)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course is an introduction to fiction with special emphasis on understanding and appreciation of the short story. The primary focus is on developing students’ ability to read critically, to learn about the principal literary elements of fiction, and to improve writing skills through the use of literature as subject matter.

(H3 908N)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course examines non-Western literature written during the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on understanding the works both as part of local and global aesthetic traditions and within their intellectual, political, social, and historical contexts.

(H3 902)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course emphasizes drama as literature and studies plays of various genres from a variety of literary periods. Eight to ten plays are analyzed in terms of meaning, form, and value.

(HF 908)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course offers a study of the relationships between literature and film, including attention to adaptation. Students will consider literature and film as cultural endeavors and as fine arts.

(H3 906)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course surveys masterpieces of Western/World literature from the beginnings in the ancient world through the 16th century. Themes of major writers are explored through consideration of their lives and work in the context of their times.

(H3 907)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course surveys masterpieces of Western/World literature from the 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, and early 21st centuries. Writers and their works are discussed within the context of their times.

(H3 905)

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course includes selected sonnets of Shakespeare and six-eight of his plays: representative selections from the comedies, tragedies, historical dramas, and romances. Emphasis is on the dramatic and literary qualities of the works, but attention also is given to film versions of the plays.

H3 911D

Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a C or better

3 lectures per week: 3 hrs transfer credit

This course examines depictions of gender and sexuality in literature, as well as the role of gender in literary production. After establishing a theoretical framework on gender construction and experiences, this course will examine relevant themes in literary genres including, but not limited to, fiction, drama, and poetry.

Full-Time Faculty


 

Dr. Alanna Cotch
Professor of English

708-709-3654

 

Dr. Jason Evans
Professor of Developmental Writing
and English & Coordinator of Developmental Writing and Reading  

708-709-7852

 

Jessica Gravely
Associate Professor & Coordinator of English

(708) 709-3628

 

Thomas Nicholas
Associate Professor of English

(708)-709-3789

 

Dr. Patrick Reichard
Professor of English

(708)-709-3596

 

Dr. Justin Vidovic
Associate Professor of English

(708)-709-7981

 

Katrina Washington
Assistant Professor

(708)-709-3502

 

Kisha Wells
Professor of English

(708)-709-3547


Adjunct Faculty


 

Jacqueline Andrews
 
 

John Klyczek
 
 

Daniel McNamara
 
 

Matthew Praxmarer
 
 

Michelle Rogers
 
 

Margaret Rossi
 
 

Dr. Cherise Stone
 
 

Cecil Wagner
 
 

Cydney Williams
 
 

Britt Zeldenrust
 

Resources


Transfer Information

The Transferable General Education Core Curriculum Requirements are divided into five areas: Communication (9 semester hours);
Humanities and Fine Arts (9 semester hours);
Mathematics (3-6 semester hours);
Physical and Life Sciences (7-8 semester hours);
and Social Sciences and Behavioral Sciences (9 semester hours).
English courses fulfill requirements in the first two areas: Communication and Humanities and Fine Arts.

Communication (9 semester hours)

The General Education Core Curriculum Requirements in Communication are satisfied by a two-course sequence in writing and one course in oral communication (Speech 101):

Writing Sequence:

  • English 101 (3 hours)
  • English 102 (3 hours

Students must earn a "C" or better in order to transfer credit for English 101 and English 102.


Humanities and Fine Arts (9 semester hours)

The General Education Core Curriculum Requirements in Humanities and Fine Arts are satisfied by at least one course from Humanities and at least one course from Fine Arts.

The following English courses satisfy requirements in the Humanities area:

  • English 211 (American Literature I) (3 hours)
  • English 212 (American Literature II) (3 hours)
  • English 215 (African-American Literature) (3 hours)
  • English 221 (Introduction to Poetry) (3 hours)
  • English 231 (British Literature I) (3 hours)
  • English 232 (British Literature II) (3 hours)
  • English 240 (Introduction to Fiction) (3 hours)
  • English 243 (Non-Western Literature) (3 hours)
  • English 252 (Introduction to Drama) (3 hours)
  • English 256 (Film and Literature) (3 hours)
  • English 261 (Western Literature I) (3 hours)
  • English 262 (Western Literature II) (3 hours)
  • English 271 (Introduction to Shakespeare) (3 hours)

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