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Sustainability at PSC

 

Sustainability at PSC

 

Overview

 

The students, faculty, staff and administration of Prairie State College are committed to improving and protecting the environment while promoting fiscal and social responsibility. We seek to educate students to understand the pressures facing the local and global environment and to increase their awareness of the importance of the “green economy.” We will also provide the skills and knowledge they will need to address the social and environmental issues that are important to our community and to support public policies that will contribute to an excellent quality of life both now and in the future.


Sustainability Strategy

The sustainability efforts of PSC are guided by its Sustainability Strategy which is outlined by the Priority Areas below.

Education

 

The aim of this priority area is to integrate content from all of the other priority areas into classrooms and other college programs for students, staff, faculty and the greater community.

Students learning about electric vehicles.

Energy

 

Energy refers to the use of energy in all of its forms by and for the college and its community.

Graph showcasing MAC Center power usage.

Social Responsibility

 

This area encompasses the social footprint of the college (including topics of food security, personal well-being, representation in governance, social equality, etc.).

Students learning about electric vehicles.

Material Flows

 

Material flows refer to the paths that different materials (paper, food, water, products, etc.) take in their interaction with campus operations, including where they come from and what happens to them after they leave the college.

Sustainability being taught in a classroom setting.

Emissions & Effluents

 

This priority area addresses the non-solid waste products (including greenhouse gas emissions) of the college or those produced on the college’s behalf.

Zero Emission Vehicle

Biodiversity

 

Biodiversity - or the variety and abundance of life in a given area - is a priority of the college to allow PSC’s campus to operate as a habitat for living organisms.

Students learning about the diverse environment on the college's grounds.

Recognition and Membership

 

PSC is an active Lead Member of the Illinois Green Economy Network (IGEN), and a member of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) Center, and the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE).

In addition to these state and national organizations, PSC also has regular representation on the Sustainability Committee of the South Metropolitan Higher Education Consortium (SMHEC), the Prairie State Regional Sustainability Network (PSRSN), and the Chicago Southland Green Committee.

AASHE Logo
IGEN Illinois Green Economy Network Logo
Prairie State Regional Sustainability Network Logo
South Metropolitan Higher Education Consortium Logo
AASHE Logo
AASHE Logo

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions


What can I recycle on campus?

Paper must be clean and dry to be recyclable (no soiled pizza boxes, for example)

  • everyday printer paper
  • newspapers
  • brochures
  • magazine
  • cardboard boxes
  • milk cartons
  • poster board

Plastic must be free of any food residue to be acceptable in our recycling

  • water/soda bottles
  • take-out containers (free of food and debris)
  • yogurt containers

Metals are some of the easiest to recycle but should also be rinsed out before disposing

  • aluminum cans
  • food cans

What's the best way for me to get involved in sustainability on campus?

If you're a student, join the Student Sustainability Club!

If you're a staff or faculty member, the best way to get involved may be to get in touch with the Sustainability Committe (members listed below)

  • Andy Schott (interim committee chair), aschott@prairiestate.edu
  • Christa Adam
  • Jan Bonavia
  • Lalinda De La Fuente
  • Angela Hung
  • Georgia Karras
  • Tim Kosiek
  • Erica Lannan
  • Michael Massengill
  • Johnson Thomas
  • Jennifer Tirado

Where can I recycle/dispose of electronics, expired medicine, paints, etc.?

 

This helpful guide can help you find nearby recycling/disposal options for many odd waste streams. Also, look out for collection events that are often sent out in the Sustainability Update newsletter.

Are there resources available for efficiency projects at PSC?

Yes! Prairie State College has a Revolving Sustainability Fund (also known as a Green Revolving Fund) which can internally finance projects with both (1) positive financial returns on investment and (2) other (non-monetary) resource savings. For more information check out the RSF here.

I have an idea for a sustainability-related campus project. What should I do?

You can get in touch with PSC’s Sustainability Committee! (See committee members above)

Can I charge my electric vehicle (EV) on campus? If so, how?

Yes! The college offers free EV charging to the PSC community via three level-2 charge ports on the west side of the Tech wing of the Main Building. Each of these ports can add up to 25 miles of range to an EV per hour of charging. To start a charging session, you’ll need to set up a free account with ChargePoint. Then you can use your smartphone or ChargePoint card to start a session.

 

Revolving Sustainability Fund

 

Fundamental to sustainability are long-term thinking and planning for the future. But in a world where putting out daily fires can be an all-consuming distraction, more immediate needs often take precedence over progress towards a sustainable future.

Green Revolving Funds are one way that some institutions encourage long-term thinking and continuous improvement. PSC’s Revolving Sustainability Fund was seeded in 2019 with $10,000 to help source and enable sustainability-related project ideas from the on-campus community. Anyone on campus (including students, faculty, and staff) are encouraged to submit project ideas!

How it works:

 

Revolving Sustainability Graphic

Project Eligibility:

Projects must meet two key criteria:

    1. A positive financial return on investment (i.e. the project will pay for itself over time)
    2. A positive sustainability impact (reduced waste, water use, energy use, emissions, etc.)

Example:

PSC’s Biology Department noticed that the typical single-use whiteboard markers used in class ran out of ink quickly and weren’t recyclable or reusable. They proposed an RSF project to purchase reusable/refillable whiteboard markers for the department.The Sustainability Committee approved the project, and the markers and refill ink were purchased. The new markers are fully recyclable, and they can be refilled with ink and reused for many years. This project eliminates the waste of hundreds of markers used by the department each year and also reduces marker costs since it is cheaper to purchase ink than a whole new marker.

How to apply:

If you have an idea for a potential RSF project, get in touch with PSC’s Sustainability Coordinator

If your project is already well-developed, you can fill out this form to formally apply for RSF funding. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, but are reviewed and approved in two batches each year. The deadline for the fall batch is September 30. The deadline for the spring batch is February 28 (or 29).

Sustainability Courses


All of the courses listed below have integrated sustainability themes and topics. By earning 15 hours of your degree requirement in these sustainability courses, you will earn a Sustainability Cord. This Cord recognizes your commitment to pursuing an understanding of economic, social, and environmental sustainability. For more information on how to earn your Sustainability Cord contact Prof. Andy Schott (aschott@prairiestate.edu)
Below are sustainability courses that you can choose from to complete the requirements of the Sustainability Cord. Click on the course name to show more information about the course, its connection to sustainability, and which sections of this course will be offered next semester.
Note: Sustainability courses at PSC are designated “sustainability-focused” or “sustainability-inclusive” based on how central topics of sustainability are to their curriculum. Both types of courses count equally to the credit requirements of the Sustainability Cord.
 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: BIOL 100-02, BIOL 200-H1, BIOL 100-MP

Credits: 4

Course Description: This one-semester introductory course for non-science majors is designed to fulfill the general education requirement for life science with a laboratory. The course covers cell biology, genetics, evolution and diversity, plant and animal structure and functions, animal behavior, and ecology.

What’s the connection to sustainability? Included in this course are discussions on acidification of oceans, acid rain, carbon footprint, endangered species, butterfly garden creation, native plants, ecosystem biodiversity, pollution biomagnification, excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and other sustainability-related topics.

 

Sustainability-focused

FA 2021 Sections: BIOL-105-LS

Credits: 3

Course Description: This course introduces biological concepts such as ecology, biodiversity, evolution and nutrient cycling. Building on this foundation, students investigate the impacts of human actions on the environment, including the natural ecosystems and human societies that reside within. The course covers urgent environmental issues including climate change, energy sources, human population growth, pollution, agriculture and other related topics. Information literacy and personal action are integrated throughout the semester to encourage informed decision making and sustainable practices.

What’s the connection to sustainability? This course grounds students, as the human species, in our position as participants of both natural and man-made systems. Every aspect of our every day lives have both local and global impacts. The aim of this course is to reveal the interconnectedness between humans and all life on Earth, and how to make positive impacts that can indefinitely sustain a high quality of life for all organisms in this world.

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections:

Credits: 3

Course Description: This course focuses on microorganisms and introduces students to scientific inquiry by examining such biological concepts as organization, heredity, evolution, and ecology. It emphasizes the role of microorganisms on health and disease and their relevance to biotechnology and industry. The course also addresses the social and economic impact of microorganisms and their effects on health, sanitation, and agriculture.

What’s the connection to sustainability? In this course, we discuss the role of microbes in the environment as well as in maintaining biodiversity in the soils for the agricultural sector. We also discuss how to use cloning to help solve man-made problems in a sustainable way (things like engineering bacteria to clean up oil spills, or using algae to make biofuels). Finally, we discuss the expected increased incidence of transmissible diseases due to climate change and changing weather patterns. For example, the increased ranges of insect-borne diseases like malaria or lyme disease, or the contamination of water sources after major flooding events.

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: BIOL 111-01, BIOL 111-02, BIOL 111-IN01

Credits: 4

Course Description: This is a course designed for science and health majors. It provides an introduction to biochemistry, molecular genetics, cell structure, cell function, cellular process, and cell division. This course also includes an introduction to Mendelian inheritance and gene activity.

What’s the connection to sustainability? In this course, we discuss climate change and actionable items students can do to help. We also discuss how to use cloning to help solve man-made problems in a sustainable way (things like engineering bacteria to clean up oil spills, or using algae to make biofuels).

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits: 5

Course Description: This course provides a detailed study of nomenclature, morphologic characteristics, and physiologic relationships of human primary and permanent teeth. The study of the anatomical structure of the head and neck region of the human body will serve as a foundation of anatomical knowledge that is essential for patient care, understanding function, oral pathology, local pain, and the administration of anesthesia.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The Course emphasizes the promotion of good health and well-being through education. The course educates dental hygiene students on the effects of dental decay in children, the classification of disease, the prevention and importance of providing patient education and access to care to decrease the preventable disease of childhood caries. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals: Goal #3 Good Health and Well-being
Goal #10 Reduced Inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits: 4

Course Description: This in-depth introduction to dental radiography concentrates on the history and characteristics of radiation in dentistry, technical aspects of radiation production, computerized digital radiography, and the components and functions of the dental X-ray machine. Hazards, safety precautions, and infection control are covered. Intraoral techniques, landmarks, processing of radiographs, and the mounting and viewing of films are emphasized. Regulations and management of clients with special needs are covered. Students assess clients, complete treatment plans, and perform a required number of examinations and radiographic surveys on mannequins and selected clients in a laboratory setting. Students are responsible for client recruitment.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the importance of good health and well-being and discusses the impacts dental radiology has on the patient. The course discusses the patient’s access to their dental records. The course also discusses the benefit of using digital radiology vs film with regard to a reduction in hazardous chemicals. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals: Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being
Goal #13 Climate Action

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits:2

Course Description: This seminar provides a comprehensive review of the role of nutrients in the biological development of health and disease. Attention is given to the process of assimilating nutritional information and making it applicable to the clinical setting. Special emphasis will be placed on methods of controlling dental disease.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course discusses the promotion of good health and well-being and discusses the implications of poor nutrition on achieving good health and well-being for all. The course discusses the crucial role of clean water and the impacts of socio economics on access to clean water and adequate nutrition. The health effects of hunger and poor nutrition due to various factors are discussed. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals: Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being
Goal #6 Clean Water and Sanitation
Goal #2 Zero Hunger

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits:2

Course Description: This course serves as an introduction to general pathology as it relates to oral pathological conditions. It discusses the pathogenesis, clinical appearance, and treatment of the more commonly seen conditions, as well as the sequence of events necessary for differential diagnosis. It discusses the role of the dental hygienist as part of the health care team in identifying, treating, and preventing oral diseases, as well as systemic diseases with oral complications.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes oral health education and disease prevention in all populations. The course discusses the need for oral health education in communities/countries with poor access to oral health education. The course will discuss the link to Betel nut quid and the incidence of oral cancer. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals: Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduced inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits:2

Course Description: This is the first in a series of five clinical dental hygiene courses. The fundamentals course is designed for entry-level, first year dental hygiene students. The role and function of the dental hygienist in preventative dentistry is included. The foundation of knowledge in the practice of dental hygiene, the Prairie State College Dental Hygiene conceptual framework and program competencies are introduced. This knowledge provides an introduction to the theory associated with clinical procedures and patient care. Students are introduced to the operation of the dental equipment, infection control, and basic instrumentation.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the responsible consumption of disposable resources. The course discusses the impact of waste of dental products and the impact on the office, the community and its global impact. The course will discuss minimizing disposable use, saving water, reducing hazardous materials, and the benefits of using reusable products when possible, such as reusable sterilization bags, autoclavable air-water syringes, autoclavable high-speed suctions and other economic and green products. The course also discusses prevention of disease, oral health promotion and access to care for all populations.
Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduced inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits:4

Course Description: This course offers an opportunity to develop competency in fundamental clinical skills in preparation for client treatment. The introduction of basic instrumentation principles and skills essential to assessment, planning, treatment, and evaluation of client care are emphasized. Focus on clinical procedures for patient assessment will include infection control, health history, extra and intraoral examination, gingival evaluation, and periodontal assessment. Students will practice on mannequins and partners in order to develop their skills.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the responsible consumption of disposable resources. The course discusses the impact of waste of dental products and the impact on the office, the community and its global impact. The course will discuss minimizing disposable use, saving water, reducing hazardous materials, and the benefits of using reusable products when possible, such as reusable sterilization bags, autoclavable air-water syringes, autoclavable high-speed suctions and other economic and green products. The course also discusses prevention of disease, oral health promotion and access to care for all populations. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal # Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduced inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits:4

Course Description: This course is a continuation of the emphasis of the role of the dental hygienist as a preventative oral health care provider. Lecture and clinical experience is devoted to analyzing assessment and the decision process in the implementation of the process of care. Students will begin utilizing their clinical skills in providing comprehensive care to clients in an ethical manner. Topics will include non-surgical periodontal supportive procedures such as documentation, calculus, instrumentation, and extrinsic stain removal and caries management.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the responsible consumption of disposable resources. The course discusses the impact of waste of dental products and the impact on the office, the community and its global impact. The course will discuss minimizing disposable use, saving water, reducing hazardous materials, and the benefits of using reusable products when possible, such as reusable sterilization bags, autoclavable air-water syringes, autoclavable high-speed suctions and other economic and green products. The course also discusses prevention of disease, oral health promotion and access to care for all populations. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduced inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits:2

Course Description: This course emphasizes, but is not limited to, the study of periodontal tissues in relation to etiology, pathogenesis, disease classification, critical analysis of patient assessment and rationale for therapy, using current theories of treatment and prognosis possibilities in the content of clinical practice.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the promotion of good health and well-being for all populations by providing evidence-based dentistry. The course also discusses oral health education to promote patients who can make informed decisions regarding their oral health. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits:2

Course Description: This course emphasizes care of clients with special oral and general systemic conditions. Included are people with physical, mental, social/emotional, and selected medical conditions, as well as the elderly and medically compromised. An interdisciplinary, problem-solving teaching strategy provides a comprehensive, coordinated approach to dental care for individuals with special needs.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the promotion of good health and well-being for all populations by treatment planning based on evidence-based dentistry. The course also discusses oral health education to promote patients who can make informed decisions regarding their oral health. The course also discusses access to care for all patients regardless of their mental, physical, or emotional ability and stresses the importance of equal treatment of all patients. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #10 Reduced Inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits:3

Course Description: Lecture and clinical experience focus on the implementation of the process of care on clinical clients in the dental hygiene clinic. Students are introduced to additional non-surgical periodontal procedures in order to provide comprehensive client centered care. These include ultrasonics, pain control and introduction to tobacco cessation. Portfolio development is introduced to document the achievement of the dental hygiene program competencies.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the responsible consumption of disposable resources. The course discusses the impact of waste of dental products and the impact on the office, the community and its global impact. The course will discuss minimizing disposable use, saving water, reducing hazardous materials, and the benefits of using reusable products when possible, such as reusable sterilization bags, autoclavable air-water syringes, autoclavable high-speed suctions and other economic and green products. The course also discusses prevention of disease, oral health promotion and access to care for all populations. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduced Inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits:5

Course Description:This course continues to build students' knowledge and competence in providing the process of care to clients in the dental hygiene clinic. Students will utilize didactic and previous clinical experience in order to provide comprehensive dental hygiene care to clients with simple to complex needs. Emphasis on the development of critical thinking skills will be encouraged in order to provide efficient and effective patient centered care. Additional non-surgical periodontal therapies will be introduced.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the responsible consumption of disposable resources. The course discusses the impact of waste of dental products and the impact on the office, the community and its global impact. The course will discuss minimizing disposable use, saving water, reducing hazardous materials, and the benefits of using reusable products when possible, such as reusable sterilization bags, autoclavable air-water syringes, autoclavable high-speed suctions and other economic and green products. The course also discusses prevention of disease, oral health promotion and access to care for all populations. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduced Inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits:5

Course Description:This is a continuation of advanced didactic and clinical application of the process of care on clients in the dental hygiene clinic. Students will continue to refine their clinical skills to gain competency as they make the transition into the practice of dental hygiene. Advanced theory introduced will enable the student to expand dental hygiene care.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the responsible consumption of disposable resources. The course discusses the impact of waste of dental products and the impact on the office, the community and its global impact. The course will discuss minimizing disposable use, saving water, reducing hazardous materials, and the benefits of using reusable products when possible, such as reusable sterilization bags, autoclavable air-water syringes, autoclavable high-speed suctions and other economic and green products. The course also discusses prevention of disease, oral health promotion and access to care for all populations. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduced Inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits:2

Course Description:This course, in addition to the areas of ethics and jurisprudence, examines the economics of dentistry, dental office management, employment considerations, resume preparation, and job interviewing. Emphasis is placed on the laws governing the practice of dentistry and dental hygiene, moral standards, and the ethical standards established by the dental hygiene profession. Practice settings for the dental hygienist, office operations, and preparation for employment are included.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the responsible consumption of disposable resources. The course discusses the impact of waste of dental products and the impact on the office, the community and its global impact. The course will discuss minimizing disposable use, saving water, reducing hazardous materials, and the benefits of using reusable products when possible, such as reusable sterilization bags, autoclavable air-water syringes, autoclavable high-speed suctions and other economic and green products. The course also discusses prevention of disease, oral health promotion and access to care for all populations. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduced Inequalities

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits:2

Course Description:This course presents a study of drugs by groups, with special consideration of those used in dentistry, including their physical and chemical properties, dosage, and therapeutic effects.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course emphasizes the concepts of sustainability through the promotion of good health and well-being for all. The course will discuss the implications of healthcare as a universal right, physical well-being, psychological well-being. The course will also discuss the healthcare providers responsibility to prescribe pharmacological agents responsible and the impacts of pharmacology on the health and well-being of the clients they serve, as well as the economic impacts of pharmacology at the patient level, nationally and globally level. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion.

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits:4

Course Description:This course covers the basic science, clinical indications, manipulative variables and procedures, physical and mechanical characteristics and clinical performance of materials used in dentistry. Lecture and laboratory emphasizes an understanding of the science of dental materials, which is essential to assess patient needs, to plan for and treat those needs, and to evaluate treatment outcomes.

What’s the connection to sustainability?The course emphasizes the importance of responsible use of dental materials and the need for disposing of hazardous material safely to reduce the impact on climate change. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #13 Climate Action
Goal #12 Responsible Consumption & Production

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits:3

Course Description:Students learn the history and influence of public health concepts and practices on the dental hygiene profession. The theory, functions, services, and administration of public health organizations are summarized. Students use research tools and statistical analysis to review and interpret dental scientific literature. Field experience is emphasized in the form of dental health presentations that are developed by students and shared in diverse communities

What’s the connection to sustainability?The course emphasizes the need for equal access to oral health education and treatment for all populations. The course discusses the concepts of public health education, development and implementation of public oral health education to meet the needs of the community to promote good health and well-being. Relevant U.N. Sustainable Development Goals:
Goal #3 Good Health and Well-Being Promotion
Goal #4 Quality Education
Goal #10 Reduce Inequity within and among countries

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits: 3

Course Description: This course provides an understanding of the structure, institutions, and general economic principles governing the operation of the American economy. Included are a study of the basic economic concepts and theories, and the forces which determine the level of production and employment in the economy. The basic principles of money and banking, economic growth and development and the world economy, and a study of the role that monetary and fiscal policy play in the determination of the economy’s level of production, employment and income are presented.

What’s the connection to sustainability? This course discusses the shortcomings of GDP and the exclusion of qualitative spending in the calculation. It highlights why we must look at more than GDP with an introduction to alternative measurements. Spending for the sake of spending could contribute to lots of pollution and depletion of resources.

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits: 3

Course Description: This course examines factors that determine the structure of resource and product markets, consumer choice, the sources that determine the level of production and employment in individual industries, and the factors which govern the level of price and output at which individual firms choose to operate. Attention is given to a study of international economics and certain contemporary economic problems.

What’s the connection to sustainability? This course discusses the shortcomings of GDP and the exclusion of qualitative spending in the calculation. It highlights why we must look at more than GDP with an introduction to alternative measurements. Spending for the sake of spending could contribute to lots of pollution and depletion of resources.

 

Sustainability-focused

FA 2021 Sections:

Credits: 2

Course Description: This course introduces non-traditional small electrical energy systems and develops an understanding of various alternative energy generation methods, principles and role of the technician.

What’s the connection to sustainability?

 

Sustainability-focused

FA 2021 Sections:

Credits: 3

Course Description: This course introduces wind energy and wind turbines concepts and relevant electrical and mechanical systems. This course assumes no prior knowledge of wind systems and will focus on residential and commercial applications. Students will have theory and hands-on lab experience.

What’s the connection to sustainability?

 

Sustainability-focused

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits: 3

Course Description: This course explores installation of residential and commercial photovoltaic systems. It will discuss stand-alone and utility-connected solar collection systems. This course will have theory and lab experience in design considerations, system configuration, codes and regulations, and maintenance. Economic analysis will also be discussed.

What’s the connection to sustainability?

 

Sustainability-focused

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits: 4

Course Description: This course continues to explore wind systems using the utility-scale, wind turbine nacelle system. This course will service, operate and troubleshoot and adjust components related to the utility-scale wind generation systems.

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: PHILO 202-MP

Credits: 3

Course Description: In this course students examine the role of reason in ethical decision-making. Traditional types of ethical reasoning are studied, compared, and applied to topics of current concern.

What’s the connection to sustainability?
Ethics raises questions about how to live well and how best to organize society in ways that promote our wellbeing and preserve our basic values. These questions lend themselves naturally to concerns about the sustainability of our social practices and institutions over time. How we live now impacts the choices that people can make in the future. So this course will explore the intersection between the social, economic, and environmental challenges that we face in trying to fulfill our responsibilities to future generations. Problems to be discussed include approaches to global poverty and famine, refugees and the right to immigrate and control immigration, the legacy of racism and the future of racial integration, the moral standing of animals, the preservation of the natural environment, and the public and private morality of climate change.

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: PHYSC-112-IN

Credits: 4

Course Description: Earth Science is a general education course which surveys topics in geology, meteorology and environmental science. The geology portion includes rocks, streams, glaciers, earthquakes, plate tectonics, volcanism, and mountain building. The meteorology portion focuses on the atmosphere, weather and climate. Man's influence on our environment is emphasized.

What’s the connection to sustainability?
The study of Earth Science can foster sustainable societies by increasing awareness of environmental issues and ecouraging research into sustainable practices. These issues include human demands on the Earth for natural resource use and urbanization. To be "geoscience literate" is to increase the potential, for example, for developing solutions to an ever-increasing carbon footprint for individuals and countries, alike.

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: All

Credits: 3

Course Description: This course introduces students to the core concepts in political science that allow for a better understanding of the principles and organization of government and politics in the United States at the national, state and local levels.

What’s the connection to sustainability? Sustainability topics, including environmental justice, will be explored through reading and writing assignments.

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits: 3

Course Description: This course introduces students to the core concepts and major issues shaping international relations and world politics. Topics to be explored may include: globalization, international organizations, human rights, environmental problems, development, terrorism, war, and peace.

What’s the connection to sustainability?

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: (none in Fall 2021)

Credits: 3

Course Description: A systematic introduction to theory and research on the ways social factors influence individual and group behavior. Examines attitudes, social perception, the establishment of norms, conformity, leadership, group dynamics and research methods, emphasizing their effects on the individual.

What’s the connection to sustainability?

 

Sustainability-inclusive

FA 2021 Sections: SOCIO-101-FX2

Credits: 3

Course Description: Introduction to Sociology explores the major concepts, theories, and research methods within the field of sociology. Students examine how their behavior is shaped by the groups they belong to and the society in which they live. Topics for discussion include culture, socialization, social institutions, deviant behaviors, social stratification, and social inequalities, particularly classism, racism, and sexism.

What’s the connection to sustainability? The course will include an exploration of the social aspects of sustainability such as poverty, gender and racial inequalities, urbanization and population, environmental justice, health and well-being, and social institutions.

Faculty Resources:

Do you teach about sustainability in your course? Do you want to, but don’t know where to start? Check out the following resources: